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The Most Famous Gates in the World and Their Interesting Stories

by OnverZe
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From gilded palaces and imposing city gates to beautiful portals to holy sites, we explore incredible gateways from around the world. Some are works of art, while others have a dark past.

The Gate of All Nations, Persepolis, Iran

The Most Famous Gates in the World and Their Interesting Stories

Persepolis, one of the largest cities in ancient history, was established in 518 BC by Darius the Great as the seat of the Achaemenid empire. The imposing Gate of All Nations is one of its evocative ruins’ most notable features. All visitors had to pass through this enormous gateway, which is manned by imposing-appearing legendary guardians, to reach the royal room. An inscription above the four colossi claims that Xerxes I erected and finished the majestic entrance.

Brandenburg Gate, Germany

The Most Famous Gates in the World and Their Interesting Stories

The Brandenburg Gate is one of the most famous gates in the world. Built in the 18th century, it is a symbol of Berlin and German reunification. The gate was commissioned by Friedrich Wilhelm II as a sign of peace and is one of the best-known landmarks in Germany.

Buland Darwaza, Uttar Pradesh, India

At 131 feet (40 metres), the spectacular entryway of the Jama Masjid mosque at Fatehpur Sikri, the Mughal Empire’s capital from 1571 to 1585, is the tallest doorway in the world. The massive gate was constructed in 1576 by the Mughal emperor Akbar to mark his victory over the kingdom of Gujarat. It is made of red sandstone and has 42 steep stairs going up to it at the front. Victory Gate is how its name, Buland Darwaza, is translated.

Catherine’s Palace, Pushkin, Russia

The Most Famous Gates in the World and Their Interesting Stories

The lavish summer home of Catherine the Great, Catherine’s Palace, is mesmerising in its Rococo splendour. The palace’s entrances are especially impressive; with its striped columns and ornate gilt decorations, they mimic the structure’s vivid blue and white façades. They provide a suitable entry to the expansive royal playground, which was initially constructed in 1717 in the town outside of St. Petersburg for the empress’ predecessor Catherine I. 

The Gate of Honour, Versailles, France

More than 200 years after the original was destroyed during the French Revolution, an exact copy of the wrought-iron and gold-leaf gate that served as the entrance to the cour d’honneur courtyard of the Palace of Versailles was built in 2008. Jules Hardouin-Mansart constructed the ornate and towering entry way in the 1680s, and historians and skilled artisans meticulously rebuilt it today. Over 100,000 gold leaves that have been fashioned into designs like the fleur de lys and crossed capital Ls that honour King Louis XIV are used to cover it.

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